what is Tatcha’s indigo coloring?

 

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I was lucky enough to receive a small jar of Tatcha’s Indigo soothing silk body butter in my October Allure beauty box. I’ve heard a lot of this brand, particularly about their Indigo products, due to the distinct coloring. I was very excited to try the product out, however; upon receiving my box I couldn’t stop thinking about the coloring so I immediately began doing some research.

ingredients

The Geisha inspired brand focuses a lot on the intersection of natural and synthetic ingredients. Now when I say natural I do not mean non-chemical ingredient, I’m simply referring to those that are derived from nature, such as plants, flowers, and other resources. Looking through the ingredient list for this body butter I found standard lotion ingredients like water, glycerine, fragrance, a variety of polymers and preservatives, alcohol, etc. The massive amount of “natural” extracts that I found surprised me, the list includes “Leaf/Stem Extract, Indigofera Tinctoria Leaf Extract, Sericin (Silk Extract), Oryza Sativa (Rice) Germ Oil, Inositol (Rice Extract), Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Algae Extract, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Stearyl Glycyrrhetinate (Licorice Extract)”. However, none of these natural extracts are what gives this product it’s distinct blue-purple coloring. The ingredient Polygonum Tinctorium or Japanese Indigo is what gives this lotion it’s signature color.

ingredient list:

Water, Glycerin, Squalane, Cyclopentasiloxane, Propanediol Diisostearyl Malate, Myristyl Myristate, Xylitol, Dipentaerythrityl Hexahydroxystearate, Behenyl Alcohol, Fragrance (Natural), Colloidal Oatmeal, Polygonum Tinctorium (Japanese Indigo) Leaf/Stem Extract, Indigofera Tinctoria Leaf Extract, Sericin (Silk Extract), Oryza Sativa (Rice) Germ Oil, Inositol (Rice Extract), Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Algae Extract, Chamomilla Recutita (Matricaria) Flower Extract, Stearyl Glycyrrhetinate (Licorice Extract), Hydrogenated Lecithin, Calcium Carbonate, Disodium Edta, Sodium Polyacrylate Starch, Polyglyceryl-10 Myristate, Sodium Dilauramidoglutamide Lysine, Potassium Sorbate, Titanium Dioxide, Tin Oxide, Sorbitan Tristearate, Beheneth-20, Sodium Acrylate/Acryloyldimethyltaurate/Dimethylacrylamide Crosspolymer, Microcrystalline Wax, Dimethicone, Ethylhexylglycerin, Dimethicone/Vinyl Dimethicone Crosspolymer, Mica, Alcohol, Phenoxyethanol

the indigo color

After doing some research I found that Polygonum Tinctorium (or Persicaria Tinctoria) more commonly referred to as Japanese Indigo comes from a plant native to Asia and is a popular natural dye for many. The Japanese Indigo plant is part of the Indigofera plant family, and the seeds are full of the compound indican. Indican is an organic (C,H,O,N-based) compound that is the precursor for the indigo dye and is found in very high concentrations in Japanese Indigo plants. The indican compound is somewhat similar in composition to the synthetic indigo dye that is commercially used today (so, how blue jeans get blue). Both compounds are organic, however, the indican compound is obtained from the plants, while the indigo dye compound is synthesized by scientists.

my review

Immediately intrigued by the color of this body butter I swiped some on the back of my hand and watched the blue color disappear as I continued rubbing the product in. According to Tatcha’s product description on their website, the Japanese Indigo has demonstrated soothing and anti-irritant properties which is great for people with sensitive or bothered skin. So it seems that I received this butter just in time for the dry winter season that is upon us. Despite the steep price tag ($48), the mousse-y texture, color, and soothing nature of the lotion has me hooked!

Have you ever tried at Tatcha product? Any comments or questions? I’d love to hear below!

All opinions are my own, this is not a sponsored post. The compound images are from Wikipedia. 

 

 

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